Gravitational Wave Detection Heralds New Era of Astronomy

LIGO scientists have announced the direct detection of gravitational waves, a discovery that won’t just open a new window on the cosmos — it’ll smash the door wide open.

BHsim-600

Two black holes coalesce in a still from a numerical simulation. Such predictions, based on Einstein’s theory of general relativity match exactly what LIGO scientists discovered on September 14, 2015. MPI for Gravitational Physics / Werner Benger / ZIB / Louisiana State University

Today, physicists announced the first-ever direct detection of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Two massive accelerating objects — in this case, a pair of stellar-mass black holes in a death-spiral — passed through spacetime like paddles sweeping through water, creating vibrations that could (barely) be felt on Earth. The results are published in Physical Review Letters.

"We have detected gravitational waves. We did it!" An elated David Reitze, executive director of LIGO, announces the result in the February 11th press conference.

“We have detected gravitational waves. We did it!” An elated David Reitze, executive director of LIGO, announces the result in the February 11th press conference.

It’s been a recurring theme in history: When scientists open a new window on the universe, they make transformative discoveries. But when LIGO, short for Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, caught waves from these two colliding black holes, it didn’t just open a new window — it smashed a door wide open, promising a breathtaking new ability to study exotic and otherwise-undetectable cosmic phenomena. Don’t be surprised if LIGO’s founders, Kip Thorne, Ronald Drever, and Rainer Weiss, earn free round-trip tickets to Stockholm to collect a Nobel Prize.

The Detection

In this schematic of LIGO, a beamsplitter sends light along two paths perpendicular to each other. Each beam bounces between two mirrors, one of which allows a fraction of the light through. When the two transmitted beams meet and interfere, they’ll cancel each other out — if the length of the path they’ve each traveled has remained constant. But if a gravitational wave passes through, it’ll warp spacetime and change that distance, creating an interference pattern. S&T: Leah Tiscione

In this schematic of LIGO, a beamsplitter sends light along two paths perpendicular to each other. Each beam bounces between two mirrors, one of which allows a fraction of the light through. When the two transmitted beams meet and interfere, they’ll cancel each other out — if the length of the path they’ve each traveled has remained constant. But if a gravitational wave passes through, it’ll warp spacetime and change that distance, creating an interference pattern.
S&T: Leah Tiscione

LIGO consists of two L-shaped facilities, one near Hanford, Washington, and the other near Livingston, Louisiana. At 5:51 a.m. (EDT) on September 14, 2015, both labs caught the gravitational-wave signature of two colliding black holes, shortly after both facilities were turned on following five years of intensive upgrades.

A series of gravitational waves from a distant galaxy first passed through the Livingston detector, then just 7 milliseconds later it passed through the detector in Hanford. Both instruments shoot infrared lasers through 4-kilometer-long arms of near-perfect vacuum. The laser light reflects off ultrapure, superpolished, and seismically isolated quartz mirrors. The passing gravitational waves slightly altered the path lengths in the arms of both detectors by about 1/1,000 the width of a proton. That slight change created a characteristic interference pattern in the laser light, an event LIGO scientists have dubbed GW150914.

LIGO didn't watch the whole many-year-long dance of the black hole duo, but it did see the last few cycles of the death spiral, the merger itself, and the "ringing" effect as the merged black hole settled into its new form. B. P. Abbott & others, "Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole", Physical Review Letters

LIGO didn’t watch the whole many-year-long dance of the black hole duo, but it did see the last few cycles of the death spiral, the merger itself, and the “ringing” effect as the merged black hole settled into its new form.
B. P. Abbott & others, “Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole”, Physical Review Letters

Based on the signal’s amplitude (that is, the height of the gravitational wave), team members estimate that the colliding black holes had the masses of about 36 and 29 Suns, respectively. Milliseconds before they merged, these behemoths spun around each other at nearly the speed of light. LIGO watched all three predicted phases of the collision: the black holes’ death spiral and ensuring merger, as well as the ringing of the merged object as it settled into its new form.

The merged black hole contains about 62 solar masses, so it’s short three solar masses — the gravitational waves themselves carried away three solar masses worth of energy.

The minuscule difference in the waves’ arrival times at the two facilities was exactly what’s expected for gravitational waves, which travel at the speed of light. The LIGO team claims a 5.1-sigma detection, meaning the odds of the signal occurring by chance are about one in 3.5 million.

These are the actual gravitational waves detected by LIGO, first at Livingston then a fraction of a second later, in the Hanford detector. LIGO

These are the actual gravitational waves detected by LIGO, first at Livingston then a fraction of a second later, in the Hanford detector.
LIGO

With only two detectors, LIGO can’t pinpoint the source’s exact location or host galaxy — it could come from anywhere within about 500 square degrees of sky, somewhere near the Large Magellanic Cloud in the Southern Hemisphere sky. Nor can they exactly pinpoint its distance, but measurements show the source lies between 700 million and 1.6 billion light-years away.

The beginning of this video (at 0:07) shows an all-too-brief simulation of the merging black holes and the extreme warping of spacetime around them:

A New Window on the Cosmos

A LIGO technician checks the detector's optics for contaminants by illuminating its mirrors. LIGO

A LIGO technician checks the detector’s optics for contaminants by illuminating its mirrors.
LIGO

The direct detection of gravitational waves opens up an entirely new spectrum that doesn’t involve any form of light. “It’s a spectrum that carries entirely new kinds of information that have so far been largely invisible,” says physicist Robert Owen (Oberlin College).

Or, as Eric Katsavounidis (MIT and LIGO team member) puts it, “This is the end of the silent-movie era in astronomy.”

Previously, radio astronomers studying pairs of neutron stars, the crushed, spinning remains of massive stars, had revealed compelling indirect evidence of gravitational waves. Einstein’s general theory of relativity says that gravitational waves should carry away orbital energy, and indeed, these pulsars’ orbits spiral inward at exactly the rate relativity predicts. Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering the first of these systems.

But direct detection has remained elusive because of the incredible difficulty of catching gravitational waves. Merging binaries involving black holes or neutron stars generate stupendous amounts of energy. “In terms of gravitational waves, for that one millisecond prior to merger, this binary black hole system was ‘brighter’ than all the rest of the universe combined!” Owen says. In fact, later calculations say that at its peak, the merging black was putting out 50 times more energy than the rest of the universe.

When two black holes twirl in a mutual orbit, they radiate gravitational waves, leaking orbital energy and spiraling in toward each other. This artist's concept portrays the radiating ripples on a 2D spacetime surface so we can better imagine it. Swinburne Astronomy Productions

When two black holes twirl in a mutual orbit, they radiate gravitational waves, leaking orbital energy and spiraling in toward each other. This artist’s concept portrays the radiating ripples on a 2D spacetime surface so we can better imagine it.
Swinburne Astronomy Productions

But the waves are incredibly difficult to detect because gravity is the weakest of the four known forces of nature, the strength of the waves fall off sharply as they traverse space, and because matter barely feels the presence of gravitational waves. “The gravitational waves from a distant galaxy that are detectable to LIGO are squeezing and stretching the Milky Way Galaxy by the width of your thumb,” says LIGO science team member Chad Hanna (Penn State University).

The National Science Foundation-funded $500 million LIGO experiment has been on the lookout for gravitational waves since 2002. But only recently, after a five-year rebuild and redesign to improve LIGO’s sensitivity, did the facilities have a realistic chance of catching these subtle spacetime ripples. LIGO began its first “advanced” observing run last fall, but improvements continue and future runs will have at least twice the sensitivity and enable LIGO to survey ten times the volume of space.

Theorists predict Advanced LIGO should catch roughly 40 binary neutron star mergers every year it runs, with an additional five binary black hole mergers, and an unknown number of signals from  black hole-neutron star mergers and supernovae. It’s even possible that LIGO could detect exotic cosmic strings.

Gravitational waves — and the experiments designed to find them — cover a wide range of frequencies. This plot shows some possible sources of gravitational waves, and the approximate signal ranges and sensitivities for various gravitational wave detectors. (Not all sources and detectors are listed here: go to the source to create your own plot.) S&T: Leah Tiscione; Source: C. J. Moore et al. / arXiv.org 2014

Gravitational waves — and the experiments designed to find them — cover a wide range of frequencies. This plot shows some possible sources of gravitational waves, and the approximate signal ranges and sensitivities for various gravitational wave detectors. (Not all sources and detectors are listed here: go to the source to create your own plot.)
S&T: Leah Tiscione; Source: C. J. Moore et al. / arXiv.org 2014

The direct detection of gravitational waves represents another triumph for Einstein, almost exactly 100 years after he predicted their existence — and despite the fact that he never thought they’d be detected. But as LIGO builds up a catalog of events in the coming years, and as other advanced detectors come online in Europe and Japan, physicists will be scrutinizing the waveforms in detail to see how closely they conform to general relativity’s predictions.

Though this black hole merger went entirely according to Einstein’s predictions, scientists hope to eventually see discrepancies that could provide vital clues to new physics, potentially reconciling contradictions between relativity and quantum theory.

“Gravitational-wave measurements will allow us to directly probe some of the most violent events in the universe, to directly measure the most tumultuous dynamics of spacetime geometry,” says Owen. “Gravitational waves would allow us to probe how spacetime really behaves under the most radical of circumstances.”

LIGO will prove a gold mine for astronomers: enabling them to study and build up a census of neutron stars, stellar-mass black holes, and other dim or otherwise impossible-to-detect objects in faraway galaxies. And LIGO also offers the tantalizing prospect of discovering new types of objects and phenomena hitherto unknown to science.

“We want to give ourselves plenty of opportunity to be surprised,” says Hanna. “We don’t want to open a new window to the universe and then refuse to look outside because we think we know what we’ll see. We expect the bread-and-butter sources, but we certainly hope it doesn’t stop there.”

Fonte: Sky and Telescope

Um momento de protagonismo de uma estrela

Uma estrela recém formada ilumina as nuvens cósmicas circundantes nesta nova imagem obtida no Observatório de La Silla do ESO, no Chile. As partículas de poeira nas enormes nuvens que rodeiam a estrela HD 97300 difundem a sua luz, tal como acontece com os faróis de um carro no nevoeiro, criando assim a nebulosa de reflexão IC 2631. Embora a HD 97300 se encontre nas luzes da ribalta por agora, a própria poeira que a torna tão proeminente anuncia o nascimento de futuras estrelas, que potencialmente lhe roubarão o protagonismo. Créditos: ESO

Uma estrela recém formada ilumina as nuvens cósmicas circundantes nesta nova imagem obtida no Observatório de La Silla do ESO, no Chile. As partículas de poeira nas enormes nuvens que rodeiam a estrela HD 97300 difundem a sua luz, tal como acontece com os faróis de um carro no nevoeiro, criando assim a nebulosa de reflexão IC 2631. Embora a HD 97300 se encontre nas luzes da ribalta por agora, a própria poeira que a torna tão proeminente anuncia o nascimento de futuras estrelas, que potencialmente lhe roubarão o protagonismo. Créditos: ESO

A região resplandescente que se observa nesta nova imagem obtida com o telescópio MPG/ESO de 2,2 metros é uma nebulosa de reflexão chamada IC 2631. Estes objetos são nuvens de poeira cósmica que refletem a radiação de uma estrela próxima, criando um magnífico espectáculo de luz como o que aqui se mostra. A IC 2631 é a nebulosa mais brilhante situada no Complexo do Camaleão, uma enorme região de nuvens de gás e poeira que albergam várias estrelas recém nascidas e estrelas ainda em formação. O complexo situa-se a cerca de 500 anos-luz de distância na constelação austral do Camaleão.

A IC 2631 está a ser iluminada pela estrela HD 97300, uma das estrelas mais jovens — e também a mais massiva e mais brilhante — da vizinhança. Esta região encontra-se repleta de material adequado à formação de estrelas, como é evidente pela presença das nebulosas escuras que se vêem na imagem por cima e por baixo da IC 2631. As nebulosas escuras são tão densas em gás e poeira que bloqueiam a radiação emitida pelas estrelas de fundo.

Apesar da sua presença dominante, a importância da HD 97300 deve ser colocada em perspectiva, já que se trata de uma estrela T Tauri, a primeira fase visível para estrelas relativamente pequenas. À medida que estas estrelas vão evoluíndo e atingem a fase adulta, perdem massa e diminuem. No entanto, durante a fase de T Tauri as estrelas ainda não se contraíram até ao tamanho moderado que apresentarão durante milhares de milhões de anos como estrelas de sequência principal.

Estas estrelas têm já uma temperatura à superfície semelhante à que terão na fase de sequência principal e, uma vez que os objetos T Tauri são essencialmente versões grandes da sua fase posterior, parecem mais brilhantes na sua juventude fora de proporções do que na sua maturidade. Estes objetos ainda não começaram a queimar hidrogénio em hélio nos seus núcleos, como as estrelas normais de sequência principal, mas começam já a “movimentar os seus músculos térmicos”, gerando calor a partir da contração.

Uma estrela recém formada ilumina as nuvens cósmicas circundantes dando origem à nebulosa de reflexão azul IC 2631, visível no centro desta imagem panorâmica de gás e poeira situada na constelação austral do Camaleão. Esta imagem foi criada a partir de dados do Digitized Sky Survey 2. Créditos: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2; Reconhecimento: Davide De Martin

Uma estrela recém formada ilumina as nuvens cósmicas circundantes dando origem à nebulosa de reflexão azul IC 2631, visível no centro desta imagem panorâmica de gás e poeira situada na constelação austral do Camaleão. Esta imagem foi criada a partir de dados do Digitized Sky Survey 2.
Créditos: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2; Reconhecimento: Davide De Martin

As nebulosas de reflexão, como a que foi criada pela HD 97300, apenas dispersam a radiação estelar de volta para o espaço. A radiação estelar mais energética, tal como a radiação ultravioleta emitida por estrelas jovens muito quentes, pode ionizar o gás circundante, fazendo com que este emita radiação e dando assim origem a nebulosas de emissão. Estas nebulosas de emissão indicam sempre a presença de estrelas mais quentes e mais poderosas que, durante a sua vida adulta, podem ser observadas a milhares de anos-luz de distância. A HD 97300 não é tão poderosa e o seu momento de protagonismo não está destinado a durar.

Fonte: Observatório Europeu do Sul (ESO)

O disco voador glacial

ALMA descobre grãos de poeira inesperadamente frios em disco de formação planetária

Os astrónomos usaram o ALMA e os telescópios do IRAM para fazer a primeira medição direta da temperatura dos grãos de poeira grandes situados nas regiões periféricas de um disco de formação planetária que se encontra em torno de uma estrela jovem. Ao observar de forma inovadora um objeto cujo nome informal é Disco Voador, os astrónomos descobriram que os grãos de poeira são muito mais frios do que o esperado: -266º Celsius. Este resultado surpreendente sugere que os modelos teóricos destes discos precisam de ser revistos. Créditos: Digitized Sky Survey 2/NASA/ESA

Os astrónomos usaram o ALMA e os telescópios do IRAM para fazer a primeira medição direta da temperatura dos grãos de poeira grandes situados nas regiões periféricas de um disco de formação planetária que se encontra em torno de uma estrela jovem. Ao observar de forma inovadora um objeto cujo nome informal é Disco Voador, os astrónomos descobriram que os grãos de poeira são muito mais frios do que o esperado: -266º Celsius. Este resultado surpreendente sugere que os modelos teóricos destes discos precisam de ser revistos.
Créditos: Digitized Sky Survey 2/NASA/ESA

Uma equipa internacional liderada por Stephane Guilloteau do Laboratoire d´Astrophysique de Bordeaux, França, mediu a temperatura de enormes grãos de poeira que se encontram em torno da jovem estrela 2MASS J16281370-2431391 na região de formação estelar Rho Ophiuchi, a cerca de 400 anos-luz de distância da Terra.

Esta estrela encontra-se rodeada por um disco de gás e poeira — chamado disco protoplanetário, uma vez que se encontra na fase inicial da formação de um sistema planetário. Este disco é visto de perfil quando observado a partir da Terra e a sua aparência em imagens no visível levou a que se lhe desse o nome informal de Disco Voador.

Os astrónomos utilizaram o ALMA para observar o brilho emitido pelas moléculas de monóxido de carbono no disco da 2MASS J16281370-2431391. As imagens revelaram-se extremamente nítidas e descobriu-se algo estranho — em alguns casos o sinal recebido era negativo. Normalmente um sinal negativo é fisicamente impossível, mas neste caso existe uma explicação, que leva a uma conclusão surpreendente.

O autor principal Stephane Guilloteau explica: “Este disco não se observa sobre um céu noturno escuro e vazio mas sim em silhueta, frente ao brilho da Nebulosa Rho Ophiuchi. O brilho difuso é demasiado extenso para ser detectado pelo ALMA, no entanto é absorvido pelo disco. O sinal negativo resultante significa que partes do disco estão mais frias do que o fundo. Na realidade, a Terra encontra-se na sombra do Disco Voador!”

A estrela jovem 2MASS J16281370-2431391 situa-se na região de formação estelar Rho Ophiuchi a cerca de 400 anos-luz de distância da Terra. Encontra-se rodeada por um disco de gás e poeira — chamado disco protoplanetário, uma vez que se encontra na fase inicial da formação de um sistema planetário. Este disco é visto de perfil quando observado a partir da Terra e a sua aparência em imagens no visível levou a que se lhe desse o nome informal de Disco Voador. Esta imagem de pormenor trata-se de uma vista no infravermelho do Disco Voador obtida pelo Telescópio Espacial Hubble da NASA/ESA. Créditos: ESO/NASA/ESA

A estrela jovem 2MASS J16281370-2431391 situa-se na região de formação estelar Rho Ophiuchi a cerca de 400 anos-luz de distância da Terra. Encontra-se rodeada por um disco de gás e poeira — chamado disco protoplanetário, uma vez que se encontra na fase inicial da formação de um sistema planetário. Este disco é visto de perfil quando observado a partir da Terra e a sua aparência em imagens no visível levou a que se lhe desse o nome informal de Disco Voador.
Esta imagem de pormenor trata-se de uma vista no infravermelho do Disco Voador obtida pelo Telescópio Espacial Hubble da NASA/ESA.
Créditos: ESO/NASA/ESA

A equipa combinou medições do disco obtidas pelo ALMA com observações do brilho de fundo obtidas pelo telescópio IRAM de 30 metros, situado em Espanha. Derivou-se uma temperatura para os grãos de poeira do disco de apenas -266º Celsius (ou seja, apenas 7º acima do zero absoluto, ou seja 7 Kelvin) à distância de cerca de 15 mil milhões de km da estrela central. Esta é a primeira medição direta da temperatura de grãos de poeira grandes (com tamanhos de cerca de 1 milímetro) em tais objetos.

A temperatura medida é muito mais baixa dos que os -258 a -253º Celsius (15 a 20 Kelvin) que a maioria dos modelos teóricos prevê.  Para explicar esta discrepância, os grãos de poeira grandes devem ter propriedades diferentes das que se assumem atualmente, de modo a permitirem o seu arrefecimento até temperaturas tão baixas.

“Para compreendermos qual o impacto desta descoberta na estrutura do disco, temos que descobrir que propriedades da poeira, que sejam plausíveis, podem resultar de tão baixas temperaturas. Temos algumas ideias — por exemplo, a temperatura pode depender do tamanho dos grãos, com os maiores a apresentarem temperaturas mais baixas do que os mais pequenos. No entanto, ainda é muito cedo para termos certezas,” acrescenta o co-autor do trabalho Emmanuel di Folco (Laboratoire d´Astrophysique de Bordeaux).

Se estas temperaturas baixas da poeira forem encontradas como sendo uma característica normal dos discos protoplanetários, este facto pode ter muitas consequências na compreensão de como é que estes objetos se formam e evoluem.

Por exemplo, propriedades diferentes da poeira afectarão o que se passa quando as partículas colidem e portanto afectarão também o seu papel na criação das sementes da formação de planetas. Ainda não sabemos se esta alteração das propriedades da poeira é ou não significativa relativamente a este exemplo.

Temperaturas baixas da poeira podem também ter um grande impacto nos discos de poeira mais pequenos que se sabe existirem. Se estes discos forem maioritariamente compostos por grãos maiores e mais frios do que o que se supõe atualmente, isto pode significar que estes discos compactos são arbitrariamente massivos e por isso podem ainda formar planetas gigantes relativamente próximos da estrela central.

São claramente necessárias mais observações, no entanto parece que a poeira mais fria descoberta pelo ALMA poderá ter consequências significativas na compreensão dos discos protoplanetários.

Fonte: Observatório Europeu do Sul (ESO)